WHAT HAPPENED?
Plaintiff was an employee of the U.S. Post Office for thirty years and was (allegedly) subject to repeated harassment from his superiors.  After filing an EEOC Complaint against the Post Office for not promoting him, Plaintiff alleged that he was subject to further harassment which resulted in his forced retirement.  Plaintiff sought civil recovery under the theory of constructive discharge, which argues that the job was made difficult so you would be forced to quit, but his claims were dismissed as untimely.
WHY IS THIS BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT?
Work discrimination claims are highly regulated by time restrictions and statute(s) of limitations.  The issue in this case is whether or not Plaintiff’s claim for constructive discharge started (1) at the time that he quit his job, or (2) on the date of the “last discriminatory act” by the employer.   The first option (1) favors the employee because it allows the employee to toll the statute of limitations until they decide to quit.  The second option (2) favors the employer because it requires that the employee either quit or file the complaint.
WHAT IS THE RULING
This case is not yet decided.
WHAT ARE THE RAMIFICATIONS OF THIS DECISION?
In the scope of this type of claim, the decision will be fairly influential.  This issue has split federal jurisdictions, so the Court’s decision here will add conformity to the law and will strongly favor one side or the other as stated in the paragraph above.
YOU SHOULD ROOT FOR GREEN IF YOU:
You are the kind of person who hates their job, talks about how they want to quit, pull brochures for interesting Master’s programs, only to change your mind when you’re given a nominal raise and a pat on the back.
YOU SHOULD ROOT FOR THE BRENNAN IF YOU:
Are a boss, and not in the cool Bruce Springsteen way, but like in the awful, no one likes you kind of way.
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